Brief

Apical resection, also known as Apexectomy, is a surgical endodontic procedure used to treat persistent infections at the root tip of a tooth, where standard root canal treatments have failed or are not possible.

The procedure is performed under local anesthesia, and the dentist makes a small incision in the gum to access the root tip. The tip and any infected tissue are removed, and the root canal is sealed with a filling material.

Although apical resection is generally considered safe, there are risks and complications, such as bleeding, infection, pain, swelling, or numbness, and in rare cases, tooth fracture.

Results are usually positive, with the procedure effectively eliminating infection and saving the tooth. Success depends on factors such as the severity of the initial infection and the patient's healing ability. Post-operative care instructions and good oral hygiene are essential for a positive outcome, and regular dental check-ups are necessary to monitor healing and prevent potential problems. If apical resection fails to eliminate the infection, tooth extraction may be necessary.

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Apical resection, also known as Apexectomy, is a type of surgical endodontic procedure used to treat infections that persist at the root tip (apex) of a tooth following root canal treatment or in cases where root canal treatment is not possible or has failed.

When is Apical Resection Necessary?

Root canal treatment is usually the first line of treatment to address root infections. However, in some cases, an infection can persist even after root canal treatment or retreatment. This can be caused by complicated root canals that cannot be completely cleaned or by structural problems of the tooth that prevent effective cleaning of the root canals.

When root canal treatment fails or is not feasible, apical resection can be performed to remove the infection and save the tooth.

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How is Apical Resection Performed?

Apical resection is performed under local anesthesia. The dentist will make a small incision in the gum to access the root tip. Then, the root tip and any infected tissue are removed. It is necessary to introduce a filling material into the root to seal the root canal.

After the procedure, sutures will be applied to close the incision, and post-operative care instructions will be given. Pain or discomfort following the procedure can be managed with pain medication prescribed by the doctor.

Risks and Complications

Apical resection is generally considered a safe procedure, but like any surgical intervention, there are potential risks and complications. These can include bleeding, infection, pain, swelling, or numbness. In rare cases, there may be a risk of tooth fracture.

Results and Prognosis

In most cases, apical resection can effectively eliminate the infection and save the tooth. However, the success of the procedure depends on several factors, including the severity of the initial infection, the shape of the root canals, and the patient's healing ability. If apical resection fails to eliminate the infection, tooth extraction may be necessary.

To ensure a positive outcome, it is essential to follow post-operative care instructions and maintain good oral hygiene. In addition, it is important to have regular dental check-ups to monitor healing and prevent any potential problems.

Frequently asked questions

Apical resection, or apexectomy, is an endodontic surgical procedure used to treat infections persisting at the root tip of a tooth, especially after a root canal treatment or in cases where root canal treatment is not possible.

It's necessary when a root canal treatment has failed to eliminate an infection or in cases of complex root canals that cannot be completely cleaned through conventional root canal procedures.

The procedure is performed under local anesthesia to minimize any discomfort. After the intervention, there may be slight sensitivity or pain, which can be managed with prescribed pain medication.

Like any surgical procedure, apical resection has potential risks, such as bleeding, infection, and rarely, tooth fracture.

Recovery time varies, but most patients feel better within a few days. It's important to follow the postoperative care instructions of the doctor.

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